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The American Civil War – more details
The American Civil War – more details

The American Civil War Museum complex gives a new face for the organization's revised mission while also integrating artifacts and holding new exhibitions, after their recent merger with the Museum of the Confederacy. The 30,000-square-foot brick and glass structure, which is located in the heart of the historic Tredegar Ironworks campus, is designed to connect the museum's existing structures while also serving as a welcoming focal point for visitors. The glass encasement of a ruined wall from an original Iron Works structure, which serves as the main lobby's distinguishing feature and serves as a visible symbol from Tredegar Street, is the most remarkable element.

The museum's new wing has two galleries, one permanent and the other rotating, as well as an experiential theater and storage for the museum's collection, which was previously housed offsite. A new main plaza off Tredegar Street improves and expands the museum's entry experience while simultaneously elevating the museum's ground level above the James River floodplain. The existing ruin wall defines the lobby's interior. It operates as a great receiving room for tourists, allowing them to get up and personal with the historic ruin, as well as a gentle boundary between public and ticketed displays. The building, both inside and out, pays homage to the existing ruins, working as a vitrine to emphasize the grandeur of what is already there.

Civil War is a term used to describe a The American Civil War lasted from 1861 to 1865, with battles taking place in 1861, 1862, 1863, 1864, and 1865. Following Abraham Lincoln's victory in 1860, issues surrounding slavery for the North and states rights for the South erupted into a full-scale war. The Confederate States of America, usually known as "the Confederacy," was created when eleven southern states (Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, and Virginia) proclaimed independence from the United States. The Civil War began on April 12, 1861, when Confederate soldiers stormed Fort Sumter, and ended on June 22, 1865, when the Confederate raider CSS Shenandoah fired the final shot in the Bering Strait, more than two months after General Lee's surrender at Appomattox.

Everything from personal accounts to momentous works that would shape a nation can be found in the Civil War documents. Maps and pictures provide rich descriptions of Civil War engagements. Through Union and Confederate military service records, pension files, and other sources, you can get a personal picture of the war. State rosters, pension records, regimental histories, pictures, and journals are among the record types gathered and linked by Historical Data Systems. This record has incalculable genealogical value. This database provides more than just reliable names and dates; it also connects researchers to the history of their ancestors. Soldier records, regiment records, battle history, and officer records are the four divisions of the collection. The soldier records section may contain any of the following information about an individual soldier: name, residence, date of entry, regiments, companies, rank, promotions, transfers, events (such as POW, wounded, etc.), and how and where the man left the service (discharge, desertion, muster out, or death).

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The American Civil War – more details
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